Classic Hollywood #127 – Before She Became A Star, Ginger Rogers 1930

On The Cusp Of Stardom – Young Ginger Rogers 1930

portrait 18-year-old Ginger Rogers 1930 A victory in the Texas Charleston contest four years ago gave Ginger Rogers the necessary stimulus for a stage career. Since her arrival on Broadway last season, after playing in vaudeville throughout the country, this talented young woman has won all sorts of honors in musical comedy and motion pictures.

She now has aspirations to be a radio star. When the inaugural Mardi Gras program is presented from WABC over the Columbia Broadcasting System on Tuesday (May 13) at 9 P.M. (E.D.S.T.) Miss Rogers will be the guest artist. One of the songs she will introduce is “I Wish I Could Be Sing A Love Song” from a new picture, “A Sap From Syracuse”, in which she plays opposite Jack Oakie. Photo: Columbia Broadcast System / NEA May 6, 1930.

92 years ago tonight listeners tuning into the radio could hear 18-year-old Ginger Rogers sing this song.

She was born Virginia Katherine McMath on July 16, 1911 in Independence, MO. Ginger got her nickname from her little cousin who couldn’t pronounce Virginia.

Ginger’s debut on Broadway was appearing at Chanin’s 46th Street Theatre from December 1929 – March 1930 as Babs Green in Top Speed.

Her film career would also begin in 1929 with A Night in a Dormitory (released 1930). From there, a long but steady climb to stardom was set in motion. She would appear in many films as a supporting player over the next three years. A pairing with Fred Astaire in Flying Down To Rio (1933) catapulted Ginger to the next level of fame.

In 1940 Ginger starred in Kitty Foyle earning her an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role.

Ginger would remain a star for decades appearing in films, on radio, the theater and later television. She died at the age of 83 on April 25, 1995 at Rancho Mirage, CA.

 

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