Author Archives: B.P.

Old New York In Photos #142 – Harbor & Skyline From Ferry

Manhattan Skyline As Seen From A Ferryboat – 1910

This stereoview photograph taken for the H.C. White Company shows one of the many ferryboats that transported passengers across the Hudson and East Rivers.

We are looking east along the Hudson River towards the lower Manhattan skyline. A few  notable buildings can be seen beyond the piers and terminals. Continue reading

A Good Cemetery Epitaph Versus A Great Epitaph

Epitaph One Upmanship – The Final Words Of A Married Couple

Since 1822 five generations of William Simpson’s ran one of New York’s oldest and most respected pawn shops. The final namesake to run Simpsons Pawnbrokers at 91 Park Row, William Rooe Simpson sold out to his partners in 1937, ending the continuous line of William Simpson’s to own and operate the hockshop. William Rooe Simpson died in 1957 and his son William David Simpson never went into the family pawn business. He became a doctor settling in Shelby, North Carolina.

When William David Simpson died at the age of 64 in 1988 he had this witty epitaph placed on his marker at Sunset cemetery in Shelby.

His wife Barbara “Bobbi” Taylor Simpson however Continue reading

The 60th Anniversary of Marilyn Monroe’s Death- And 6 Rare Photos Of Marilyn During Her Life

60 Years Ago Today Marilyn Monroe Died

With few exceptions there not many people that are as popular decades after their death as Marilyn Monroe.

The public which normally cannot remember yesterday’s headlines has not forgotten Marilyn. Over 200 books about Marilyn will attest to that. Her films are still enticing to old film buffs and new generations of movie fans. And her face is everywhere. Continue reading

Carl Yastrzemski Avoids A Pitch

Carl Yastrzemski Gets A Brush-back Pitch From Twins Tom Hall

The lesson in big league ball after hitting a home run used to be- get ready to hit the deck.

Pitchers would routinely throw at hitters on their next at bat after homering. And not for showboating like players do today by standing in the batters box admiring their blast or flipping the bat.

No, all you had to do in the old days was hit a home run and certain pitchers would make sure that you would end up on your keister during your next trip to the plate. A pitcher who does that today risks ejection, suspension and the batter charging the mound to pummel the pitcher.

The news slug says:

St. Paul – Minneapolis, June 9, 1969. A NEW TWIST. Boston Red Sox Carl Yastrzemski (8) twists away from home plate on brush-back pitch from Minnesota Twins pitcher Tom Hall in the 5th inning of American League game Monday in the Twin Cities. Yastrzemski lead off in first inning with a home run.  Minnesota catcher John Roseboro gloves ball. photo: AP

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Old New York In Photos #141 – Children’s Recreation On Rooftops

Children On New York’s Rooftops 1909-1910

Children playing on a roof in New York City April 28, 1910 from the series Living On (A) Skyscraper photo George G. Bain Collection Library of Congress (LOC)

In the early twentieth century the roofs of New York would offer a respite from hot days in New York. While roofs could be dangerous, the streets were full of peril with horses, trolleys and filth.

The news organization headed by George G. Bain sent its photographers up to the roofs to see life from this perspective. Continue reading

Old New York In Photos #140 – July 4, 1860

Independence Day In New York Watching The Regatta 1860

July 4, 1860 regatta at The Battery. photo: Anthony

Patriotism, Parades and Pyrotechnics

In 1860 a year before the nation was split into two warring factions, New Yorkers celebrated the 84th anniversary of Independence Day in glorious fashion.

The day proliferated with excursions, theatricals, balloon ascensions, salutes, military parades, fireworks and – a regatta.

Regatta derives from Venetian, meaning a contention for mastery or contest. The New York regatta held on July 4 was a series of rowed and sailed boat races held near Castle Clinton at The Battery in New York bay.

All of the photographs seen here were taken by the firm of E. & H.T. Anthony as stereoviews. Continue reading

Managers Connie Mack & John McGraw Decide Who Bats First At The First All-Star Game

Athletics Manager Connie Mack & Former Giants Manager John McGraw Have A Contest Before The First All-Star Game 1933

Photo shows – Manager Connie Mack of Americans (left) Manager John McGraw of Nationals choose for first up with the aid of a bat.

In the game of the century played at Comiskey Park, Chicago, July 6, the picked team of the American League defeated the picked team of the National League 4-2. Photo: Acme July 6, 1933

It’s hard to believe that this is how they decided home field advantage in the American League’s Comiskey Park for the first All-Star Game, but it’s true.

Kids used to do this in pick-up games in parks to see who would bat first. Continue reading

Old New York In Postcards #26 – Broadway 1895-1915

Views Along Broadway From Bowling Green To Washington Heights

Broadway and 62nd Street – The Colonial Vaudeville Theater is on the left, 1913

Broadway means New York City. Sure there are other Broadway’s in the United States, but none have the same clout that New York’s Broadway does. It is the longest street in Manhattan and one of the oldest. What the Dutch called De Heere Straat and later De Heere Wegh, became Great George Street under English rule. The street was paved in 1707, but only from Bowling Green to Trinity Church at Wall Street. After the Revolution, New York’s citizens began renaming streets and Great George Street became Broadway.

Here are some postcard views of Broadway dating from 1895 – 1915 Continue reading

It’s Not “Plan 9 From Outer Space” But This May Be The Worst Movie Ever Made

Orgy Of The Dead Features Incredibly Bad Acting, & Writing

An Ed Wood Masterpiece From The Writer & Director Of “Plan 9 From Outer Space”

Plan 9 From Outer Space (1957) is acknowledged by classic movie buffs as among the worst films ever made. Edward D. Wood Jr. the director-writer of Plan 9 has a body of work to make a moviegoer either cringe or provoke hysterical laughter. Continue reading

Old New York In Photos #139 – Zeppelin And The Woolworth Building

The Dirigible Los Angeles Flying Near The Woolworth Building – 1929

Graf Zeppelin’s Sister – Los Angeles Joins In Great Reception For Dr. Eckener
New York – Photo shows : The dirigible Los Angeles, older sister of the Graf Zeppelin, flying above the Woolworth Building during the reception for Dr. Hugo Eckener commander of the Graf. Photo: Underwood & Underwood August 30, 1929.

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